Emacs Repeat Command

Do It Again

Emacs has a repeat command that executes your last command whatever it was. Its fairly easy to learn and use.

Ctrl-x z

Run that and it should re-run whatever command you carried out before.

One of the nice things about repeat command, each time you press z, it does it again.

Say you delete four lines, do Ctrl-x z, then keep pressing z. Each time another line disappears.

Press z ten times and ten lines disappear.

Note

You only need press Ctrl-x once, then press as many 'z' as you like. You don't need to press Ctrl-x again. Once is fine.

Its easy to hit Ctrl-z, which minimizes Emacs. One solution is to remap Ctrl-z to also run repeat command.

All Round Shadow In Photoshop

Dark Halo

A little more on shadows in Photoshop. If you wish to produce an "All Round Shadow" in Photoshop, this too is easy after you have spent hours searching a solution.

As with the previous post on Photoshop Drop Shadow, this is pretty much the same procedure. Only at the end do the settings differ. Here's a quick 'n' dirty walk-through.

Fire up Photoshop, open a new blank canvas image. The canvas needs to be bigger than the graphic you want drop-shadowed. Open the graphic you want shadowed.

Ctrl-A > Ctrl-C.

Go to the blank canvas and paste the image.

Ctrl-V to paste image on canvas.

Photoshop should center the image on the canvas.

This creates a new layer. Check this on the Layer Panel, normally on the right.

Double click the new layer to launch a Layer Style properties box.

Select Drop Shadow.

Then set Distance to zero. This is important and produces the "All Round Shadow" we are after.

You can mess around with a few of other the settings such as Spread, Size, Angle, Opacity and Color.

You get a preview to see how the changes affect your image.

Select what ya like, Click OK and save your changes to disk.

Done!

Drop Shadow In Photoshop

A Dark Side

To create a drop shadow in Photoshop is fairly easy, once you have spent hours with Google sifting through the howto offers, that don't quite fit the bill.

Here's a quick 'n' dirty walk-through to spare your grief.

Fire up Photoshop, open a new blank canvas image. The canvas needs to be bigger than the graphic you want drop-shadowed. Open the graphic you want shadowed.

Ctrl-A > Ctrl-C.

Go to the blank canvas and paste the image.

Ctrl-V to paste image on canvas.

Photoshop should center the image on the canvas.

This creates a new layer. Check this on the Layer Panel, normally on the right.

Double click the new layer to launch a Layer Style properties box.

Select Drop Shadow.

Then you can mess with a few of the settings such as Distance, Spread, Size, Angle Opacity and Color.

You get a preview to see how the changes affect your image.

Select what ya like, Click OK and save your changes to disk.

Done!